You and I can make things change


The answer to the great challenges we face today is not in finding the 'right' solutions and scaling them. I believe that India, and many other countries are too complex and diverse for this. Instead, we must ask what we ourselves, each of us, can do to change things. 

Progress every day

Progress every day

Making tomorrow 1% better than today is as important as imagining a 100% better future. A lot of people believe that many small steps will not add up a big change. They are totally wrong. Progress must be continuous. This provides the motivation for people to get involved and stay.

An informed society

An informed society

Information is the glue of modern societies. We can share ideas, refine them, and implement them together if we know how to manage knowledge effectively. The world's most successful countries are good at harnessing knowledge. India cannot compete effectively with them unless we do the same.

Solutions, together

Solutions, together

For a lot of problems, the solutions are well known in society, but often this knowledge is distributed among different people. It is only by joining forces together that we really recognise how much we are capable of, and then solving public problems seems much easier.

We, the government

We, the government

Remember what Abraham Lincoln said? Democracy is government of the people and for the people, but also (and most importantly) BY the people. We must believe that we can create the government we want, and the development we want, together. Then the future we imagine will be within reach.

Click and listen to my series of short audios about The Problem Solving Society. Please note that the order matters.

1. Increase the number of problem-solving people. 

2. Why me? Isn't this someone else's job? 

3. A few minutes a day is enough. Persistence is the real virtue. 

4. First, give yourself the ability to solve public problems.

5. Seven four-letter words to live by, every day.

6. The 7 four-letter words explained (*)

* This piece is extracted from my podcast with Amit Varma, which aired as episode 160 of his series, The Seen and the Unseen.